Psychology doctor says Brainiacs, not birdbrains: Crows possess higher intelligence long thought a primarily human attribute

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Last Updated on March 4, 2021 by admin

Psychology doctor says Brainiacs, not birdbrains Crows possess higher intelligence long thought a primarily human attribute

Brainiacs, not birdbrains: Crows possess higher intelligence long thought a primarily human attribute
Brainiacs, not birdbrains: Crows possess higher intelligence long thought a primarily human attribute

Psychology doctor says, Research f inds that crows know what they know and may ponder the content of their own minds, a manifestation of upper intelligence and analytical thought long believed the only province of humans and a couple of other higher mammals.

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Whether crows, ravens, and other corvids are making multipart tools like hooked sticks to realize grubs, solving geometry puzzles made famous by Aesop, or nudging a clueless hedgehog across a highway before it becomes roadkill, they need long impressed scientists with their intelligence and creativity.
Now the birds can add another feather to their brainiac claims Research unveiled on Thursday in Science finds that crows know what they know and will ponder the content of their own minds, a manifestation of upper intelligence and analytical thought long believed the sole province of humans and a few of of other higher mammals.
“Together, the two papers show that intelligence/consciousness are grounded in connectivity and activity patterns of neurons” within the foremost neuron-dense a neighborhood of the bird brain, called the pallium. The extent to which similar properties present themselves might be simply a matter of scale: what percentage neurons are available to work .”

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What if I check out it this way? — and it’s a pillar of upper intelligence. Knowing what you recognize is additionally a kind of consciousness, and thus the invention that more and more nonhumans seem to possess it raises tricky questions on how we treat them.
It has been an honest week for bird brains! said crow expert John Marzluff of the University of Washington, who wasn’t involved within the new studies. especially , the invention that crows know what they know won’t surprise avian scientists, “who have increasingly demonstrated the cognitive abilities of birds, … but they go to be relieved! This research is groundbreaking.” To test whether crows know and should analyze the contents of their brains, neurobiologist Andreas Nieder of the University of Tübingen in Germany trained two birds to peck a red or a blue target on a panel, depending whether or not they saw a faint light.
Nieder kept varying the rule, with the birds told which color meant what red = saw it, or blue = saw it only after the flash.
That required the crows, Glenn and Ozzy, to remain monitoring their brains; that that they had |they’d”> that they had |they’d”> that they had |they’d”> that they had |they’d”> that they had |they’d”> that they had a second or two to figure out what they had seen|they’d”> that they had a second or two to figure out what they had seen and tell Nieder by choosing the corresponding target.
While the crows were solving these tasks, the researchers were tracking the activity of the many their neurons.
When the crows reported having seen a faint light, sensory neurons were active between the flash and thus the birds pecking the color that meant, yes, I saw that. If the crows didn’t perceive the precise same faint stimulus, the nerve cells remained silent, and thus the bird pecked, no, I didn’t see anything. Ozzy and Glenn’s brain activity systematically changed counting on whether or not that that that they had perceived the dim flash.
During the delay, many neurons responded according to the crows’ impending report, rather than to the brightness of the sunshine .
The study shows that neurons within the foremost complex a neighborhood of the crows’ brain, the pallium, “do have activity that represents not what was shown to them, but what they later report,” said Herculano-Houzel.
Scientists have long known that crows and ravens have unusually large forebrains, but unlike mammals’ forebrains the neocortex corvids’ do not have the six connected layers thought to supply higher intelligence.
In theory, any brain that features a large amount of neurons connected into associative circuitry could be expected to feature flexibility and complexity to behavior, said Herculano-Houzel.

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Psychology doctor says Brainiacs, not birdbrains Crows possess higher intelligence long thought a primarily human attribute

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